Industry

Industry

  • Unveiling the new MHIRJ Flight Deck app

    Unveiling the new MHIRJ Flight Deck app

    Flight Deck app

    Becoming a safer and better informed CRJ pilot is now just a tap away. With the creation of the new MHIRJ Flight Deck app, pilots can access critical flight information with the touch of a finger.

    This newly-introduced app eliminates the need for pilots to carry heavy and cumbersome operating manuals, navigation charts, reference handbooks, flight checklists, logbooks, and weather information in their flight bag. Instead, they can access all necessary documents using a single iPad®, which weighs less than 1.5 pounds.

    With the MHIRJ Flight Deck app, CRJ pilots can enjoy the benefits of going paperless by instantly storing and accessing manual data and other documentation from their iPad® - without Wi-Fi.

    Improving on existing apps, it empowers pilots to efficiently manage documents using tags, color codes, and favorites, ensuring faster access. New features such as one-touch full-screen mode and thumbnail page view make reading PDF files swift and intuitive. Documents can be easily annotated using ink, highlighter, text, notes, and various other tools. All of which reduces pilot workload and increases safety.

    The app that does it all

    No other solution combines automatic temporary revision updates, content user control, and aircraft serial number-specific information into one application. The new app also generates FAA, EASA, and TC-compliant audit trails for paperless¹ operations to ensure flight manuals are current. Time is saved, and pilots are always ready to fly per the latest regulatory requirements. In addition, fleet managers, dispatchers, and other members of your team can drag and drop electronic versions of aircraft documents, manuals, and forms into online folders, allowing pilots to control all their electronic documentation in one place.

    Find out more on how we’ve made going paperless in the cockpit, painless.

    For subscription, pricing, and availability of the CRJ flight manuals on the MHIRJ Flight Deck application, contact sales.techpubs@mhirj.com or call 437-800 3366.

    For technical assistance with the MHIRJ Flight Deck application, please reach out to support@obds.com or call +1 (450) 476-1420.

    2 MIN.

    Unveiling the new MHIRJ Flight Deck app

    Unveiling the new MHIRJ Flight Deck app
    Flight Deck app

    Becoming a safer and better informed CRJ pilot is now just a tap away. With the creation of the new MHIRJ Flight Deck app, pilots can access critical flight information with the touch of a finger.

    This newly-introduced app eliminates the need for pilots to carry heavy and cumbersome operating manuals, navigation charts, reference handbooks, flight checklists, logbooks, and weather information in their flight bag. Instead, they can access all necessary documents using a single iPad®, which weighs less than 1.5 pounds.

    With the MHIRJ Flight Deck app, CRJ pilots can enjoy the benefits of going paperless by instantly storing and accessing manual data and other documentation from their iPad® - without Wi-Fi.

    Improving on existing apps, it empowers pilots to efficiently manage documents using tags, color codes, and favorites, ensuring faster access. New features such as one-touch full-screen mode and thumbnail page view make reading PDF files swift and intuitive. Documents can be easily annotated using ink, highlighter, text, notes, and various other tools. All of which reduces pilot workload and increases safety.

    The app that does it all

    No other solution combines automatic temporary revision updates, content user control, and aircraft serial number-specific information into one application. The new app also generates FAA, EASA, and TC-compliant audit trails for paperless¹ operations to ensure flight manuals are current. Time is saved, and pilots are always ready to fly per the latest regulatory requirements. In addition, fleet managers, dispatchers, and other members of your team can drag and drop electronic versions of aircraft documents, manuals, and forms into online folders, allowing pilots to control all their electronic documentation in one place.

    Find out more on how we’ve made going paperless in the cockpit, painless.

    For subscription, pricing, and availability of the CRJ flight manuals on the MHIRJ Flight Deck application, contact sales.techpubs@mhirj.com or call 437-800 3366.

    For technical assistance with the MHIRJ Flight Deck application, please reach out to support@obds.com or call +1 (450) 476-1420.

    2 MIN.
  • CELEBRATING EXCELLENCE

    CELEBRATING EXCELLENCE

    RELIABILITY AWARD

    Reliability is the backbone of aviation industry standards. Passengers, airlines, manufacturers, and maintenance providers benefit from great teamwork and collaboration, leading to consistent and reliable aircraft service. This kind of excellence doesn’t go unnoticed.

    World-class teamwork merits world-class recognition. And that’s exactly why MHIRJ is excited to announce the 2022 Airline Reliability Awards recipients once again this year. Without further ado, here are this year’s winners in their respective categories and locations:
     

    CRJ700/900/1000 Product Category

    North America

    Endeavor Air, a subsidiary of Delta Airlines, has secured the 2022 Reliability Award for North America, reaffirming its commitment to operational excellence in its category. As the largest CRJ900 operator, managing a fleet of over 120+ aircraft is no easy feat. Their exemplary track-record this year resulted in a dispatch reliability of 98.90%.

    Europe

    Lufthansa CityLine proudly received the 2022 Reliability Award for Europe, achieving a dispatch reliability of 99.55%. Lufthansa CityLine, a wholly owned subsidiary of Deutsche Lufthansa AG, provides an essential role in connecting communities to and from major hubs in Munich and Frankfurt, in addition to numerous destinations throughout Europe.

    Asia Pacific                              

    IBEX Airlines was named the winner for Asia-Pacific with its dispatch reliability overall score of 99.79%. IBEX was founded in 1999 and started operations on a Sendai-Kansai Route in 2000 with a CRJ200. Today, they connect ten domestic airports in Japan in Code Share partnership with All Nippon Airways (ANA) and are a significant contributor to the revitalizing regional economies in Japan.

    CRJ100/200 Product Category

    Europe

    Air Nostrum won the 2022 Reliability Award in the CRJ100/200 product category with its reliability score of 99.26%. Air Nostrum has won the award 10 times for the European region for both the CRJ100/200 and the CRJ700/900/1000 categories. This achievement makes Air Nostrum stand out as a regional champion, continually leading the way for the European regional aviation market by consistently exceeding expectations.

    The importance of dispatch reliability

    Dispatch reliability is a critical factor in aircraft operation. If the aircraft is not available, even for a short period, the consequences can be significant. Safely and efficiently transporting 99% or more of an airline’s passengers in a year is nothing short of incredible. When considering candidates for the Dispatch Reliability Award, MHIRJ focuses on product performance, airline support, and customer focus. These three pillars support the passenger experience and define how successful an airline is at transporting passengers from point A to point B.

    Worldwide recognition

    Established in 2009, the Dispatch Reliability Award recognizes worldwide operators of CRJ Series regional jets who have achieved industry-leading dispatch reliability rates of 98.9% or better.

    How award winners are identified

    To identify award winners, the aircraft dispatch reliability of airlines is monitored through a data system called FRACAS (Failure Reporting, Analysis, and Corrective Action System). This reporting system is used by aviation companies to detect, assess, and correct failures in flight dispatch—streamlining flight processes through adaptive correction. MHIRJ has its own FRACAS database through which CRJ Series aircraft in service around the globe are monitored, allowing for accurate and consistent comparative data on all CRJ Series aircraft in service.

    In addition to recognizing operators for their success, the awards showcase airlines that achieve world-class performance reliability, and strive to promote a commitment to safety, consistency, and best practices. Congratulations to the recipients, and thank you for your stellar service!

     

    3 MIN.

    CELEBRATING EXCELLENCE

    CELEBRATING EXCELLENCE
    RELIABILITY AWARD

    Reliability is the backbone of aviation industry standards. Passengers, airlines, manufacturers, and maintenance providers benefit from great teamwork and collaboration, leading to consistent and reliable aircraft service. This kind of excellence doesn’t go unnoticed.

    World-class teamwork merits world-class recognition. And that’s exactly why MHIRJ is excited to announce the 2022 Airline Reliability Awards recipients once again this year. Without further ado, here are this year’s winners in their respective categories and locations:
     

    CRJ700/900/1000 Product Category

    North America

    Endeavor Air, a subsidiary of Delta Airlines, has secured the 2022 Reliability Award for North America, reaffirming its commitment to operational excellence in its category. As the largest CRJ900 operator, managing a fleet of over 120+ aircraft is no easy feat. Their exemplary track-record this year resulted in a dispatch reliability of 98.90%.

    Europe

    Lufthansa CityLine proudly received the 2022 Reliability Award for Europe, achieving a dispatch reliability of 99.55%. Lufthansa CityLine, a wholly owned subsidiary of Deutsche Lufthansa AG, provides an essential role in connecting communities to and from major hubs in Munich and Frankfurt, in addition to numerous destinations throughout Europe.

    Asia Pacific                              

    IBEX Airlines was named the winner for Asia-Pacific with its dispatch reliability overall score of 99.79%. IBEX was founded in 1999 and started operations on a Sendai-Kansai Route in 2000 with a CRJ200. Today, they connect ten domestic airports in Japan in Code Share partnership with All Nippon Airways (ANA) and are a significant contributor to the revitalizing regional economies in Japan.

    CRJ100/200 Product Category

    Europe

    Air Nostrum won the 2022 Reliability Award in the CRJ100/200 product category with its reliability score of 99.26%. Air Nostrum has won the award 10 times for the European region for both the CRJ100/200 and the CRJ700/900/1000 categories. This achievement makes Air Nostrum stand out as a regional champion, continually leading the way for the European regional aviation market by consistently exceeding expectations.

    The importance of dispatch reliability

    Dispatch reliability is a critical factor in aircraft operation. If the aircraft is not available, even for a short period, the consequences can be significant. Safely and efficiently transporting 99% or more of an airline’s passengers in a year is nothing short of incredible. When considering candidates for the Dispatch Reliability Award, MHIRJ focuses on product performance, airline support, and customer focus. These three pillars support the passenger experience and define how successful an airline is at transporting passengers from point A to point B.

    Worldwide recognition

    Established in 2009, the Dispatch Reliability Award recognizes worldwide operators of CRJ Series regional jets who have achieved industry-leading dispatch reliability rates of 98.9% or better.

    How award winners are identified

    To identify award winners, the aircraft dispatch reliability of airlines is monitored through a data system called FRACAS (Failure Reporting, Analysis, and Corrective Action System). This reporting system is used by aviation companies to detect, assess, and correct failures in flight dispatch—streamlining flight processes through adaptive correction. MHIRJ has its own FRACAS database through which CRJ Series aircraft in service around the globe are monitored, allowing for accurate and consistent comparative data on all CRJ Series aircraft in service.

    In addition to recognizing operators for their success, the awards showcase airlines that achieve world-class performance reliability, and strive to promote a commitment to safety, consistency, and best practices. Congratulations to the recipients, and thank you for your stellar service!

     

    3 MIN.
  • THE INDUSTRY NEED FOR AVIATION TECHNICIANS

    THE INDUSTRY NEED FOR AVIATION TECHNICIANS

    ROSS MITCHEL ARTICLE COVER

    We are all familiar with the impacts of the pilot shortage in recent years, but did you know that there is also a labor shortage that extends behind the scenes? As the airline business continues to soar, so does the need for qualified technicians to support it. 

     

    The regional aviation industry has had its fair share of challenges with the pilot shortage, but with growing attention to this problem, and some measures being debated including the Let Experienced Pilots Fly legislation, there is hope that the industry will begin the long healing process. However, there still remains a much less discussed, and yet equally significant shortage of aircraft technicians to support the industry.
     

    This presents a new world of opportunity for the next generation to pursue fulfilling careers in aviation. But it also requires more promotion of the industry and the benefits that come along with it, as well as ample funding for training. We had a conversation with Ross Mitchell, Vice President of Strategy and Business Development at MHIRJ to talk about the viable solutions that are on the table:

    Watch the full video

     

     

     

    Look out for more on the labor shortage and other industry news on WINGSPAN.

    2 MIN.

    THE INDUSTRY NEED FOR AVIATION TECHNICIANS

    THE INDUSTRY NEED FOR AVIATION TECHNICIANS
    ROSS MITCHEL ARTICLE COVER

    We are all familiar with the impacts of the pilot shortage in recent years, but did you know that there is also a labor shortage that extends behind the scenes? As the airline business continues to soar, so does the need for qualified technicians to support it. 

     

    The regional aviation industry has had its fair share of challenges with the pilot shortage, but with growing attention to this problem, and some measures being debated including the Let Experienced Pilots Fly legislation, there is hope that the industry will begin the long healing process. However, there still remains a much less discussed, and yet equally significant shortage of aircraft technicians to support the industry.
     

    This presents a new world of opportunity for the next generation to pursue fulfilling careers in aviation. But it also requires more promotion of the industry and the benefits that come along with it, as well as ample funding for training. We had a conversation with Ross Mitchell, Vice President of Strategy and Business Development at MHIRJ to talk about the viable solutions that are on the table:

    Watch the full video

     

     

     

    Look out for more on the labor shortage and other industry news on WINGSPAN.

    2 MIN.
  • 2023 FAA REAUTHORIZATION BILL

    2023 FAA REAUTHORIZATION BILL

    2023 FAA REAUTHORIZATION BILL

     

    As the need to ramp up the aviation workforce continues, efforts are being made to lessen critical industry labor shortages. From increasing access to funding to improving training, the 2023 FAA Reauthorization Bill aims to make effective changes with a long-lasting impact.

     

    Pilot and technician shortages, service interruptions, and other recent obstacles have put a spotlight on the need for policy changes within the industry. That’s why the bipartisan FAA Reauthorization Act aims to put measures into place that will help alleviate the challenges, improve safety and service, and provide funding to hire more pilots, technicians, and air traffic controllers, as well as implement the latest safety technology.

    Every 5 years, the funding and mandate of the FAA are defined by Congress through the FAA Reauthorization Act, and 2023 is such a year when the future course of aviation in the U.S. will be set with the passage of the Act. This year, it’s more important than ever to make effective changes that will change the course of the future of the industry.

    "The labor shortage in the aviation industry translates into parked aircraft and canceled flights. The industry needs more pilots and more aircraft technicians to keep communities connected and protect air service from getting interrupted across the United States,” said Ross Mitchell, Vice-President, Strategy and Business Development, at MHIRJ.

     

    2023 FAA Reauthorization Bill

     

    SUPPORTING EDUCATION AND RECRUITMENT

    In order to meet workforce demands, part of this bill focuses on increasing funding for the FAA’s Aviation Workforce Development Grant Program. This program is designed to grow the aviation workforce pipeline by supporting the education and recruitment of pilots, maintenance technicians, and aircraft manufacturing technical workers. It also calls for the FAA to develop a national plan to address the critical shortages being felt across the industry.

    While it’s imperative to address current workforce challenges, it’s also necessary to remove the barriers that prevent the next generation of professionals from pursuing a career in aviation. The extremely high cost of training limits access to education and training for many, so increasing funding will open the doors to opportunity for a far more diverse group of people, thus building a larger workforce in less time.

     

    CHANGING THE EXISTING LANDSCAPE

    One of the solutions to the pilot shortage that has been receiving the most attention is changing the mandatory retirement age for pilots. This latest bill finally looks to increase the mandatory retirement age for commercial pilots from the current 65 to 67. The majority of the pilot workforce is still healthy, capable, and wanting to continue their careers past the age of 65, so this change will reduce the shortage being felt today by allowing the most experienced pilots to continue flying. This will positively impact the availability of pilots, helping close the gap while new pilots complete their training.

    Another notable change presented in the bill is allowing pilots to complete a portion of their training hours in simulators. These simulators are an incredible tool with state-of-the-art technology designed to mimic real-life aircraft and prepare pilots for situations that cannot be simulated on actual training aircraft. From engine failure to hazardous wind shear, experience is everything when it comes to safety training—and that’s where technology comes in. Modernizing training requirements and leveraging modern simulators can help get pilots accredited and in the air faster, helping to close the pilot shortage gap. This would be a significant improvement from the traditional flight training that requires accumulating flight hours on a single-engine aircraft.

     

    We look forward to seeing these changes take action and bring the aviation industry into a great new era. Full details on what the 2023 FAA reauthorization bill brings to the table can be found on the U.S. Senate website.

    3 MIN.

    2023 FAA REAUTHORIZATION BILL

    2023 FAA REAUTHORIZATION BILL
    2023 FAA REAUTHORIZATION BILL

     

    As the need to ramp up the aviation workforce continues, efforts are being made to lessen critical industry labor shortages. From increasing access to funding to improving training, the 2023 FAA Reauthorization Bill aims to make effective changes with a long-lasting impact.

     

    Pilot and technician shortages, service interruptions, and other recent obstacles have put a spotlight on the need for policy changes within the industry. That’s why the bipartisan FAA Reauthorization Act aims to put measures into place that will help alleviate the challenges, improve safety and service, and provide funding to hire more pilots, technicians, and air traffic controllers, as well as implement the latest safety technology.

    Every 5 years, the funding and mandate of the FAA are defined by Congress through the FAA Reauthorization Act, and 2023 is such a year when the future course of aviation in the U.S. will be set with the passage of the Act. This year, it’s more important than ever to make effective changes that will change the course of the future of the industry.

    "The labor shortage in the aviation industry translates into parked aircraft and canceled flights. The industry needs more pilots and more aircraft technicians to keep communities connected and protect air service from getting interrupted across the United States,” said Ross Mitchell, Vice-President, Strategy and Business Development, at MHIRJ.

     

    2023 FAA Reauthorization Bill

     

    SUPPORTING EDUCATION AND RECRUITMENT

    In order to meet workforce demands, part of this bill focuses on increasing funding for the FAA’s Aviation Workforce Development Grant Program. This program is designed to grow the aviation workforce pipeline by supporting the education and recruitment of pilots, maintenance technicians, and aircraft manufacturing technical workers. It also calls for the FAA to develop a national plan to address the critical shortages being felt across the industry.

    While it’s imperative to address current workforce challenges, it’s also necessary to remove the barriers that prevent the next generation of professionals from pursuing a career in aviation. The extremely high cost of training limits access to education and training for many, so increasing funding will open the doors to opportunity for a far more diverse group of people, thus building a larger workforce in less time.

     

    CHANGING THE EXISTING LANDSCAPE

    One of the solutions to the pilot shortage that has been receiving the most attention is changing the mandatory retirement age for pilots. This latest bill finally looks to increase the mandatory retirement age for commercial pilots from the current 65 to 67. The majority of the pilot workforce is still healthy, capable, and wanting to continue their careers past the age of 65, so this change will reduce the shortage being felt today by allowing the most experienced pilots to continue flying. This will positively impact the availability of pilots, helping close the gap while new pilots complete their training.

    Another notable change presented in the bill is allowing pilots to complete a portion of their training hours in simulators. These simulators are an incredible tool with state-of-the-art technology designed to mimic real-life aircraft and prepare pilots for situations that cannot be simulated on actual training aircraft. From engine failure to hazardous wind shear, experience is everything when it comes to safety training—and that’s where technology comes in. Modernizing training requirements and leveraging modern simulators can help get pilots accredited and in the air faster, helping to close the pilot shortage gap. This would be a significant improvement from the traditional flight training that requires accumulating flight hours on a single-engine aircraft.

     

    We look forward to seeing these changes take action and bring the aviation industry into a great new era. Full details on what the 2023 FAA reauthorization bill brings to the table can be found on the U.S. Senate website.

    3 MIN.
  • EFFECTIVE TRAINING ON THE CRJ CABIN TRAINER

    EFFECTIVE TRAINING ON THE CRJ CABIN TRAINER

    Cutting the ribbon for the new CRJ Cabin Trainer

    Regardless of the destination, when passengers board an aircraft for their flight, the one thing they expect from the airline is top-notch customer service. The quality of in-flight service can earn an operator long-term customer loyalty and industry prestige. Achieving this starts with having a well-trained cabin crew.

    Knowing the pivotal role the cabin crew plays in an airline's success, MHIRJ teamed up with long-standing partner Endeavor Air to build a first-of-its-kind cabin trainer for the CRJ900 aircraft designed to elevate the efficiency and effectiveness of training like never before. Renowned for optimally operating its CRJ fleet, this innovative training device helps Endeavor ensure it continues to be a successful, top-rated regional airline.

     

    CUSTOMIZED FOR ENDEAVOR TO ELEVATE TRAINING

    This innovative new CRJ trainer was developed from a CRJ900 fuselage and simulates features like overhead bins, lighting, seats, and a PA system, all customized to match the Endeavor brand. It even comes complete with a galley and functional working components like storage bins and service carts. Thanks to this new training structure, Endeavor's flight crew trainees are in an environment that reflects what they will experience in real life, making their training more thorough and effective.

     

    Inside the CRJ Cabin Trainer

     

    A SENSORY, AUDITORY, AND VISUALLY AUTHENTIC EXPERIENCE

    This new CRJ cabin trainer will be used by Endeavor's flight attendants for procedures training, emergency training, and service training. Unlike the existing tools that were used before, it delivers a far more realistic, aircraft-specific, and scenario-based training.

    For the first time, cabin crew trainees are exposed to the sounds, lights, and smoke system, which helps with drills such as onboarding, in-flight beverage services, emergency drills, and other training exercises in a truly realistic environment. This means tasks can be done more efficiently and in a more in-depth manner. This new tool will also allow Endeavor to develop a new FAA-approved training curriculum, including FAA approval for the device.

     

    WINGSPAN - Effective Training on the CRJ Cabin Trainer

     

    BENEFITING THE AIRLINE, CABIN CREWS, AND CUSTOMERS

    The benefits of the new device are far-reaching. This new tool enables Endeavor to have a better-trained cabin crew for an even safer and more efficient airline. For cabin crew trainees, it allows them to complete training faster with practical hands-on learning that equips them to be more skilled at their jobs. And given the current industry demand for new hires, the new trainer also appeals to those considering a career as a flight attendant.

    "The cabin trainer has revolutionized the hands-on learning experience for Endeavor flight attendants," said Patty Allen, VP of Inflight Services at Endeavor. "It's a true showpiece for Endeavor, and I'm thrilled we can provide this state-of-the-art equipment for both our existing employees and those who choose to begin their careers with us."

    Nicknamed "Amelia" in honor of the renowned American aviation pioneer and first female to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean, the cabin trainer now lives in pride of place at the Endeavor Learning Center, which opened in Minneapolis, Minnesota in early 2023.

     

    IN RECOGNITION OF EXCELLENCE

    Operating 124 regional jets on 600 daily flights to 100 destinations in the US, Canada, and the Caribbean, Endeavor Air understands the importance of operating with excellence across all areas of its business. That dedication to going above and beyond has been recognized by the industry once again this year, with Endeavor Air receiving the 2022 Aircraft Reliability Award. This honor celebrates the various teams at Endeavor - Maintenance and Maintenance Programs, Reliability, Technical Operations, and Fleet Management - that have stood out amongst their North American peers operating CRJ fleets throughout the year.

    We congratulate Endeavor on this prestigious award and our successful accomplishment of building this one-of-a-kind cabin trainer. We look forward to continuing to partner together in the years ahead.

    5 MIN.

    EFFECTIVE TRAINING ON THE CRJ CABIN TRAINER

    EFFECTIVE TRAINING ON THE CRJ CABIN TRAINER
    Cutting the ribbon for the new CRJ Cabin Trainer

    Regardless of the destination, when passengers board an aircraft for their flight, the one thing they expect from the airline is top-notch customer service. The quality of in-flight service can earn an operator long-term customer loyalty and industry prestige. Achieving this starts with having a well-trained cabin crew.

    Knowing the pivotal role the cabin crew plays in an airline's success, MHIRJ teamed up with long-standing partner Endeavor Air to build a first-of-its-kind cabin trainer for the CRJ900 aircraft designed to elevate the efficiency and effectiveness of training like never before. Renowned for optimally operating its CRJ fleet, this innovative training device helps Endeavor ensure it continues to be a successful, top-rated regional airline.

     

    CUSTOMIZED FOR ENDEAVOR TO ELEVATE TRAINING

    This innovative new CRJ trainer was developed from a CRJ900 fuselage and simulates features like overhead bins, lighting, seats, and a PA system, all customized to match the Endeavor brand. It even comes complete with a galley and functional working components like storage bins and service carts. Thanks to this new training structure, Endeavor's flight crew trainees are in an environment that reflects what they will experience in real life, making their training more thorough and effective.

     

    Inside the CRJ Cabin Trainer

     

    A SENSORY, AUDITORY, AND VISUALLY AUTHENTIC EXPERIENCE

    This new CRJ cabin trainer will be used by Endeavor's flight attendants for procedures training, emergency training, and service training. Unlike the existing tools that were used before, it delivers a far more realistic, aircraft-specific, and scenario-based training.

    For the first time, cabin crew trainees are exposed to the sounds, lights, and smoke system, which helps with drills such as onboarding, in-flight beverage services, emergency drills, and other training exercises in a truly realistic environment. This means tasks can be done more efficiently and in a more in-depth manner. This new tool will also allow Endeavor to develop a new FAA-approved training curriculum, including FAA approval for the device.

     

    WINGSPAN - Effective Training on the CRJ Cabin Trainer

     

    BENEFITING THE AIRLINE, CABIN CREWS, AND CUSTOMERS

    The benefits of the new device are far-reaching. This new tool enables Endeavor to have a better-trained cabin crew for an even safer and more efficient airline. For cabin crew trainees, it allows them to complete training faster with practical hands-on learning that equips them to be more skilled at their jobs. And given the current industry demand for new hires, the new trainer also appeals to those considering a career as a flight attendant.

    "The cabin trainer has revolutionized the hands-on learning experience for Endeavor flight attendants," said Patty Allen, VP of Inflight Services at Endeavor. "It's a true showpiece for Endeavor, and I'm thrilled we can provide this state-of-the-art equipment for both our existing employees and those who choose to begin their careers with us."

    Nicknamed "Amelia" in honor of the renowned American aviation pioneer and first female to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean, the cabin trainer now lives in pride of place at the Endeavor Learning Center, which opened in Minneapolis, Minnesota in early 2023.

     

    IN RECOGNITION OF EXCELLENCE

    Operating 124 regional jets on 600 daily flights to 100 destinations in the US, Canada, and the Caribbean, Endeavor Air understands the importance of operating with excellence across all areas of its business. That dedication to going above and beyond has been recognized by the industry once again this year, with Endeavor Air receiving the 2022 Aircraft Reliability Award. This honor celebrates the various teams at Endeavor - Maintenance and Maintenance Programs, Reliability, Technical Operations, and Fleet Management - that have stood out amongst their North American peers operating CRJ fleets throughout the year.

    We congratulate Endeavor on this prestigious award and our successful accomplishment of building this one-of-a-kind cabin trainer. We look forward to continuing to partner together in the years ahead.

    5 MIN.
  • RALLY FOR THE INDUSTRY

    RALLY FOR THE INDUSTRY

    Rally for the Industry

    The labor shortage in the aviation industry is impacting air travel across the nation. A shortage of pilots and skilled technicians is causing interrupted service and disconnecting communities. We’re rallying with our industry partners to create necessary legislative changes, and you can too.

    Join the Rally for Air Service movement here to help keep the industry soaring!


    Check out our articles in WINGSPAN for expert insights into what’s being done, and what’s to come:

    As regional travel continues to be impacted by the pilot shortage, smaller communities remain the most affected. MHIRJ’s Ross Mitchell talks about what MHIRJ and its industry partners are doing to take a collective stand and push for change.

    The race to close the gap in the pilot shortage continues. As short- and long-term solutions are rolled out, how can new technologies play a pivotal role in getting pilots safely trained and accredited faster? Aviation expert Randy Babbitt weighs in.

    Bryan Bedford, CEO and President of Republic Airways, discusses the effects of the pilot shortage on family, work, economic development, flight cost, and service availability Bedford also talks about how regulations around pilot training need to change in order to alleviate the pilot shortage without sacrificing safety.

    The effects of the pilot shortage continue to be felt across the nation. We sat down with Dion Flannery, CEO & President of PSA Airlines, and Chairman of the Regional Airline Association and discussed the realities everyone faces until concrete changes are implemented.

    Industry analyst and data expert, Courtney Miller, spoke to MHIRJ about what he sees happening if viable solutions are not put into play to help resolve the pilot shortage and maintain regional service.

    Drew Jacoby Lemos, Vice-President of Government Affairs with the Regional Airline Association (RAA), talks to us about the importance of industry stakeholders rallying together to help alleviate the labor shortage and make room for new technologies.

    Rick Leach, President and CEO of GoJet Airlines, speaks to MHIRJ about how the pilot shortage is affecting the integration of new technologies and the availability of aircraft like the new CRJ550.

    Industry expert, Addison Schonland, talks about what the aviation industry can and should do differently post-pandemic to help get more planes off the ground and new pilots in the air. Schonland also comments on the structural barriers that continue to limit the pace of progress.

    Amel Belkhamsa, Head of Aftermarket Commercial Services at MHIRJ talks about how we are continuing to evolve post-pandemic to become even stronger as an MRO provider, and better equipped to serve our ever-growing customer base.

     

    1 MIN.

    RALLY FOR THE INDUSTRY

    RALLY FOR THE INDUSTRY
    Rally for the Industry

    The labor shortage in the aviation industry is impacting air travel across the nation. A shortage of pilots and skilled technicians is causing interrupted service and disconnecting communities. We’re rallying with our industry partners to create necessary legislative changes, and you can too.

    Join the Rally for Air Service movement here to help keep the industry soaring!


    Check out our articles in WINGSPAN for expert insights into what’s being done, and what’s to come:

    As regional travel continues to be impacted by the pilot shortage, smaller communities remain the most affected. MHIRJ’s Ross Mitchell talks about what MHIRJ and its industry partners are doing to take a collective stand and push for change.

    The race to close the gap in the pilot shortage continues. As short- and long-term solutions are rolled out, how can new technologies play a pivotal role in getting pilots safely trained and accredited faster? Aviation expert Randy Babbitt weighs in.

    Bryan Bedford, CEO and President of Republic Airways, discusses the effects of the pilot shortage on family, work, economic development, flight cost, and service availability Bedford also talks about how regulations around pilot training need to change in order to alleviate the pilot shortage without sacrificing safety.

    The effects of the pilot shortage continue to be felt across the nation. We sat down with Dion Flannery, CEO & President of PSA Airlines, and Chairman of the Regional Airline Association and discussed the realities everyone faces until concrete changes are implemented.

    Industry analyst and data expert, Courtney Miller, spoke to MHIRJ about what he sees happening if viable solutions are not put into play to help resolve the pilot shortage and maintain regional service.

    Drew Jacoby Lemos, Vice-President of Government Affairs with the Regional Airline Association (RAA), talks to us about the importance of industry stakeholders rallying together to help alleviate the labor shortage and make room for new technologies.

    Rick Leach, President and CEO of GoJet Airlines, speaks to MHIRJ about how the pilot shortage is affecting the integration of new technologies and the availability of aircraft like the new CRJ550.

    Industry expert, Addison Schonland, talks about what the aviation industry can and should do differently post-pandemic to help get more planes off the ground and new pilots in the air. Schonland also comments on the structural barriers that continue to limit the pace of progress.

    Amel Belkhamsa, Head of Aftermarket Commercial Services at MHIRJ talks about how we are continuing to evolve post-pandemic to become even stronger as an MRO provider, and better equipped to serve our ever-growing customer base.

     

    1 MIN.
  • THE NEED FOR LEGISLATIVE CHANGE

    THE NEED FOR LEGISLATIVE CHANGE

    WINGSPAN Senators Mark Kelly and Deborah Fischer

    Putting the current aviation labor shortage in the past requires effective policy change, and it requires immediate action to help make that happen. The recent introduction of two key pieces of legislation in the U.S. Senate will help in the efforts to solve the current crisis. The Aviation Workforce, Opportunity, Recruiting, Knowledge, and Supply Act (Aviation WORKS Act) by Senators Mark Kelly and Deborah Fischer, as well as the Let Experienced Pilots Fly Act, introduced by Senator Lindsey Graham and co-sponsored by Senators Mark Kelly, Joe Manchin, Chuck Grassley, Marsha Blackburn and Cynthia Lummis, promise to do just that.

    Change requires action, so discussions on how bipartisan legislation could strengthen aviation and aerospace workforce pipelines and boost investments are top of the agenda. The Aviation WORKS Act will serve to expand access to existing pilot and aviation maintenance technician workforce programs, and encourage future funding, while the Let Experienced Pilots Fly Act extends the retirement age for pilots from 65 to 67.

     

    A SHORTAGE THAT GOES BEYOND PILOTS

    While the pilot shortage has taken the spotlight in terms of acute needs, the industry shortage is also affecting other critical positions like mechanics and other technical maintenance staff. The Aviation WORKS Act will expand FAA workforce grants, which will give more people access to training for careers in these skilled positions. These skilled workers are just as critical to the future of the aviation industry as pilots. If the shortage of pilots was resolved, currently there are not enough technicians to service the fleet and keep it flying.

    To put things in perspective, it’s important to take a look at the numbers when all of these positions are combined. The aerospace and defense industry currently supports nearly 2 million jobs across the United States. Over the next two decades, Boeing estimates that the industry will need 612,000 new pilots, 626,000 new maintenance technicians, and 886,000 new cabin crew members.

     

    THE SHORT-TERM SOLUTION

    The Let Experienced Pilots Fly Act will extend the retirement age for pilots, allowing the seasoned professionals with the most experience to continue their careers. The Act will provide time for the industry to adapt to the current shortage and take action to accelerate the training of new pilots. Of course, this is not the end of the need for reform, but it does acknowledge the serious nature of the shortage in aviation and is a great first step in solving the current crisis.

    There will continue to be the need for better funding and training for pilots and technicians. The road to becoming an aviation professional is long and costly, and if we are to have a qualified and diverse workforce, action needs to be taken to increase funding. While that change is currently being contemplated, the Act will ease the short-term constraints and allow for the continued functioning of the air transport system.

     

    FUNDING FOR THE FUTURE

    So how can the Aviation WORKS Act tackle the aviation workforce shortage? By boosting workforce development funding for pilots and maintenance technicians. This act would quadruple funding for the Aviation Workforce Development Program to $20 million. It would also create more avenues for aviation careers via two additional grant programs.

    The first is an aviation manufacturing workforce development program to support manufacturers and higher education institutions in expanding skills training and education opportunities. The second is a sector-based grant program that would create partnerships between employers, labor unions, institutions of higher education, and other community stakeholders to better connect workers with training and employers.

    By continuing to communicate the effects of the growing pilot shortage on our aviation system and local communities, we are better able to advocate for meaningful policy solutions like the Aviation WORKS Act. Thank you to the Senators who are eager to support critical change.

    We’ll continue bringing you updates via WINGSPAN as developments unfold. In the meantime, be sure to visit Rally for Air Service to see how you too can get involved.

    3 MIN.

    THE NEED FOR LEGISLATIVE CHANGE

    THE NEED FOR LEGISLATIVE CHANGE
    WINGSPAN Senators Mark Kelly and Deborah Fischer

    Putting the current aviation labor shortage in the past requires effective policy change, and it requires immediate action to help make that happen. The recent introduction of two key pieces of legislation in the U.S. Senate will help in the efforts to solve the current crisis. The Aviation Workforce, Opportunity, Recruiting, Knowledge, and Supply Act (Aviation WORKS Act) by Senators Mark Kelly and Deborah Fischer, as well as the Let Experienced Pilots Fly Act, introduced by Senator Lindsey Graham and co-sponsored by Senators Mark Kelly, Joe Manchin, Chuck Grassley, Marsha Blackburn and Cynthia Lummis, promise to do just that.

    Change requires action, so discussions on how bipartisan legislation could strengthen aviation and aerospace workforce pipelines and boost investments are top of the agenda. The Aviation WORKS Act will serve to expand access to existing pilot and aviation maintenance technician workforce programs, and encourage future funding, while the Let Experienced Pilots Fly Act extends the retirement age for pilots from 65 to 67.

     

    A SHORTAGE THAT GOES BEYOND PILOTS

    While the pilot shortage has taken the spotlight in terms of acute needs, the industry shortage is also affecting other critical positions like mechanics and other technical maintenance staff. The Aviation WORKS Act will expand FAA workforce grants, which will give more people access to training for careers in these skilled positions. These skilled workers are just as critical to the future of the aviation industry as pilots. If the shortage of pilots was resolved, currently there are not enough technicians to service the fleet and keep it flying.

    To put things in perspective, it’s important to take a look at the numbers when all of these positions are combined. The aerospace and defense industry currently supports nearly 2 million jobs across the United States. Over the next two decades, Boeing estimates that the industry will need 612,000 new pilots, 626,000 new maintenance technicians, and 886,000 new cabin crew members.

     

    THE SHORT-TERM SOLUTION

    The Let Experienced Pilots Fly Act will extend the retirement age for pilots, allowing the seasoned professionals with the most experience to continue their careers. The Act will provide time for the industry to adapt to the current shortage and take action to accelerate the training of new pilots. Of course, this is not the end of the need for reform, but it does acknowledge the serious nature of the shortage in aviation and is a great first step in solving the current crisis.

    There will continue to be the need for better funding and training for pilots and technicians. The road to becoming an aviation professional is long and costly, and if we are to have a qualified and diverse workforce, action needs to be taken to increase funding. While that change is currently being contemplated, the Act will ease the short-term constraints and allow for the continued functioning of the air transport system.

     

    FUNDING FOR THE FUTURE

    So how can the Aviation WORKS Act tackle the aviation workforce shortage? By boosting workforce development funding for pilots and maintenance technicians. This act would quadruple funding for the Aviation Workforce Development Program to $20 million. It would also create more avenues for aviation careers via two additional grant programs.

    The first is an aviation manufacturing workforce development program to support manufacturers and higher education institutions in expanding skills training and education opportunities. The second is a sector-based grant program that would create partnerships between employers, labor unions, institutions of higher education, and other community stakeholders to better connect workers with training and employers.

    By continuing to communicate the effects of the growing pilot shortage on our aviation system and local communities, we are better able to advocate for meaningful policy solutions like the Aviation WORKS Act. Thank you to the Senators who are eager to support critical change.

    We’ll continue bringing you updates via WINGSPAN as developments unfold. In the meantime, be sure to visit Rally for Air Service to see how you too can get involved.

    3 MIN.
  • PILOT SHORTAGE: IN THE NEWS

    PILOT SHORTAGE: IN THE NEWS

    WINGSPAN - Pilot Shortage: In The News

    In the last two years, more than 320 airports in the U.S. have lost air service, with over 150 of them losing more than a quarter of their service as a result of the pilot shortage. We have been actively using our platform to keep a spotlight on the issue and to help raise awareness. As the problem persists, we’re seeing news outlets bring increasing attention to the challenges we are all facing as industry players and travelers.

    While the pilot shortage is leaving a gaping hole in the industry, the shortage is showing to have disproportionate effects on regional airlines and larger airlines. Flight Global covered a story on how the pilot shortage is currently eroding U.S. discounters’ low-cost edge in the market, while consequently improving the competitive position of much larger airlines.

     

    A GLOBAL ISSUE

    But the problem isn’t just being felt in the U.S. According to Transport Canada, approximately 1,100 pilot licenses were issued each year before the pandemic hit. When this number was complemented by foreign-trained pilots, the number of pilots available was more than enough to satisfy the needs of not just the large carriers like WestJet and Air Canada, but also the regional, charter and cargo airlines.

    However, CBC News reported some staggering numbers that really illustrate the issue at hand. As the demand for air travel practically ground to a halt in 2020, so did the number of licenses being issued to new pilots. Government data revealed that fewer than 500 licenses were awarded in Canada in 2020, which then dropped even lower to under 300 in 2021, and just a mere 238 in 2022.

    Even with this data in hand, "there aren’t enough people starting up at the bottom of the scale to get people interested in flying," John Gradek, a lecturer in aviation management at McGill University in Montreal, told CTV News. With costs as high as $100,000 or more to train as a pilot in Canada, paired with little to no financial aid available to students, the problem doesn’t show signs of slowing down.

    "This is why we’re advocating for governments to start subsidized pilot training. We’re talking about getting flight training funded the same way other more traditional college degrees get funded,” MHIRJ’s own Ross Mitchell explained in a recent interview.

     

    A WIDENING GAP

    Although air travel has since bounced back following the pandemic, many airlines continue to struggle to bring enough pilots back into the mix. A 2022 analysis by the consulting firm Oliver Wyman estimates that the U.S. airline industry is lacking around 8,000 pilots. They also project that the situation will continue to worsen over the next decade as the ever-increasing demand continues to overtake the number of new pilots entering the industry—despite the expectation that the supply of new commercial pilots is expected to pick up over the next few years.

    However, with the way things stand now, the increased supply can’t possibly meet the demand. As a result, it’s expected that North America will be short nearly 30,000 pilots by 2032.

    As travelers continue to feel the frustrations of canceled flights, and the industry feels the strain of grounded planes and schedule cutbacks, we’ll continue to help increase media coverage on the issue, share the latest developments with our community, and rally for change alongside our industry partners.

    5 MIN.

    PILOT SHORTAGE: IN THE NEWS

    PILOT SHORTAGE: IN THE NEWS
    WINGSPAN - Pilot Shortage: In The News

    In the last two years, more than 320 airports in the U.S. have lost air service, with over 150 of them losing more than a quarter of their service as a result of the pilot shortage. We have been actively using our platform to keep a spotlight on the issue and to help raise awareness. As the problem persists, we’re seeing news outlets bring increasing attention to the challenges we are all facing as industry players and travelers.

    While the pilot shortage is leaving a gaping hole in the industry, the shortage is showing to have disproportionate effects on regional airlines and larger airlines. Flight Global covered a story on how the pilot shortage is currently eroding U.S. discounters’ low-cost edge in the market, while consequently improving the competitive position of much larger airlines.

     

    A GLOBAL ISSUE

    But the problem isn’t just being felt in the U.S. According to Transport Canada, approximately 1,100 pilot licenses were issued each year before the pandemic hit. When this number was complemented by foreign-trained pilots, the number of pilots available was more than enough to satisfy the needs of not just the large carriers like WestJet and Air Canada, but also the regional, charter and cargo airlines.

    However, CBC News reported some staggering numbers that really illustrate the issue at hand. As the demand for air travel practically ground to a halt in 2020, so did the number of licenses being issued to new pilots. Government data revealed that fewer than 500 licenses were awarded in Canada in 2020, which then dropped even lower to under 300 in 2021, and just a mere 238 in 2022.

    Even with this data in hand, "there aren’t enough people starting up at the bottom of the scale to get people interested in flying," John Gradek, a lecturer in aviation management at McGill University in Montreal, told CTV News. With costs as high as $100,000 or more to train as a pilot in Canada, paired with little to no financial aid available to students, the problem doesn’t show signs of slowing down.

    "This is why we’re advocating for governments to start subsidized pilot training. We’re talking about getting flight training funded the same way other more traditional college degrees get funded,” MHIRJ’s own Ross Mitchell explained in a recent interview.

     

    A WIDENING GAP

    Although air travel has since bounced back following the pandemic, many airlines continue to struggle to bring enough pilots back into the mix. A 2022 analysis by the consulting firm Oliver Wyman estimates that the U.S. airline industry is lacking around 8,000 pilots. They also project that the situation will continue to worsen over the next decade as the ever-increasing demand continues to overtake the number of new pilots entering the industry—despite the expectation that the supply of new commercial pilots is expected to pick up over the next few years.

    However, with the way things stand now, the increased supply can’t possibly meet the demand. As a result, it’s expected that North America will be short nearly 30,000 pilots by 2032.

    As travelers continue to feel the frustrations of canceled flights, and the industry feels the strain of grounded planes and schedule cutbacks, we’ll continue to help increase media coverage on the issue, share the latest developments with our community, and rally for change alongside our industry partners.

    5 MIN.
  • PILOT SHORTAGE: DOING THINGS DIFFERENTLY

    PILOT SHORTAGE: DOING THINGS DIFFERENTLY

    WINGSPAN - Pilot Shortage: Doing Things Differently

    As with so many other industries, the pandemic impacted the aviation industry in ways that nobody could have anticipated. As we emerge on the other side, we all have the opportunity to take what we have learned from the entire experience and use that knowledge to decide how we can do things differently moving forward.

    The pandemic truly highlighted the need for change in the aviation industry. It magnified smaller issues into larger ones, and revealed new challenges entirely. MHIRJ is active in pushing for improvement alongside our industry partners, so while attending the Regional Airline Association meeting in Washington, D.C. we had an insightful conversation with Addison Schonland, industry analyst and reporter for AirInsight.

    From turning pain points into opportunities, and building technologies up to bring costs down, he shared his thoughts on the factors that can and will reinvent the industry as we know it:

     

    Watch the full video

     


     

    BREAKING PAST BARRIERS

    As we transition into a new era of opportunity, there are, of course, a number of structural barriers that continue to limit the pace of progress that we would ideally like to see. The biggest obstacle continues to be the pilot shortage. From pilots taking early retirement during the pandemic, to the financial and circumstantial challenges that new pilots face, the focus continues to lie on how we can remedy the situation.

    What remains clear is the fact that we need new pilots in the air to get planes off the ground, but regulations remain rigid—including the 1,500 hours required to become a fully licensed pilot:

     

     

    Watch the full video

     


     

    FUTURE SOLUTIONS

    Beyond changing the number of hours required for accreditation, or accelerating the means of acquiring them, financial factors are also at play. One viable solution that could help move the needle is funding for tuition—which currently costs approximately $200,000. As this number is not realistically affordable for most people, conversations need to be had with regulators and legislators on how we can create better, safer training with lower tuition.

     

    Will legislative change help? Yes. Will new technologies help? Yes. Will this take time, testing, and new safety measures? Yes. And this is why maintaining a united front continues to be our greatest strength in expediting new measures so that we can put real change on the horizon.
     

    We’ll continue to cover the latest developments right here in WINGSPAN, and continue to lobby for collective change.

    6 MIN.

    PILOT SHORTAGE: DOING THINGS DIFFERENTLY

    PILOT SHORTAGE: DOING THINGS DIFFERENTLY
    WINGSPAN - Pilot Shortage: Doing Things Differently

    As with so many other industries, the pandemic impacted the aviation industry in ways that nobody could have anticipated. As we emerge on the other side, we all have the opportunity to take what we have learned from the entire experience and use that knowledge to decide how we can do things differently moving forward.

    The pandemic truly highlighted the need for change in the aviation industry. It magnified smaller issues into larger ones, and revealed new challenges entirely. MHIRJ is active in pushing for improvement alongside our industry partners, so while attending the Regional Airline Association meeting in Washington, D.C. we had an insightful conversation with Addison Schonland, industry analyst and reporter for AirInsight.

    From turning pain points into opportunities, and building technologies up to bring costs down, he shared his thoughts on the factors that can and will reinvent the industry as we know it:

     

    Watch the full video

     


     

    BREAKING PAST BARRIERS

    As we transition into a new era of opportunity, there are, of course, a number of structural barriers that continue to limit the pace of progress that we would ideally like to see. The biggest obstacle continues to be the pilot shortage. From pilots taking early retirement during the pandemic, to the financial and circumstantial challenges that new pilots face, the focus continues to lie on how we can remedy the situation.

    What remains clear is the fact that we need new pilots in the air to get planes off the ground, but regulations remain rigid—including the 1,500 hours required to become a fully licensed pilot:

     

     

    Watch the full video

     


     

    FUTURE SOLUTIONS

    Beyond changing the number of hours required for accreditation, or accelerating the means of acquiring them, financial factors are also at play. One viable solution that could help move the needle is funding for tuition—which currently costs approximately $200,000. As this number is not realistically affordable for most people, conversations need to be had with regulators and legislators on how we can create better, safer training with lower tuition.

     

    Will legislative change help? Yes. Will new technologies help? Yes. Will this take time, testing, and new safety measures? Yes. And this is why maintaining a united front continues to be our greatest strength in expediting new measures so that we can put real change on the horizon.
     

    We’ll continue to cover the latest developments right here in WINGSPAN, and continue to lobby for collective change.

    6 MIN.
  • PILOT SHORTAGE: THE FUTURE OF REGIONAL AVIATION

    PILOT SHORTAGE: THE FUTURE OF REGIONAL AVIATION

    WINGSPAN - Pilot Shortage: The Future of Regional Aviation

    One of the biggest game changers recently in the regional aviation space is the introduction of the impressive CRJ550 aircraft. Since launching just a few years ago, it’s raised the bar in terms of comfort, space, and amenities for regional travel. But with the pilot shortage keeping many of these aircraft grounded, what’s next for the future of regional aviation?

    The demand to get aircraft off the ground and in the air is ever-present. However, the obstacle of the pilot shortage continues to stand in the way. As MHIRJ remains united with industry partners in lobbying for change, we attended the Regional Airline Association meeting in Washington, D.C. While there, we chatted with Rick Leach, President and CEO of GoJet Airlines—a regional carrier for United Airlines. We discussed what’s on the horizon for regional aviation, and what it’s going to take to get there:

     

    Watch the full video


     

    POWERING A PREMIUM EXPERIENCE

    The CRJ550 aircraft is the only aircraft in its class with premium seating in two thirds of its spacious cabins, as well as first-class food and beverages—all of which has been overwhelmingly well received by the traveling public. For a regional product to rival the amenities of mainline aircraft is a big deal for the industry in that it’s helped change people’s perspective and created new appeal.

    “It has amenities for the first-class passenger that are unmatched. It has leg room, and it has the ability to store ample carry-on baggage so people can bring their luggage on, get it there, grab it and go. They're not waiting on the jet bridge. Customers even want to schedule their flights around the 550,” explains Leach.

    POWER IN NUMBERS

    In order to keep these impressive aircraft in flight, it takes banding together with other industry players to keep the momentum of change in the air. “Our voice is much stronger together,” says Leach, when talking about how leaders of regional carriers have been working alongside MHIRJ and other partners. “We have aircraft that are sitting on the ground because we can't staff them since we don't have the capacity or the pilots with the caliber needed to be in those cockpits.”

    However, as much as these pilots are needed, and needed fast, the industry cannot compromise on safety. Pilots still need to undergo rigorous training to ensure safety measures are maintained to the highest degree. What needs to happen from here on is for pilots to aspire to fly with regional airlines as much as their mainline counterparts. The fact that the CRJ500 is one of the highest-rated aircraft in the United fleet does hold weight, “and we're very proud of that for a regional aircraft to have that kind of a recognition,” Leach continues.

    With even more growth on the horizon, they are not only trying to get existing aircraft back in the air. They are preparing to add even more to the fleet. This kind of organic growth presents amazing opportunity for airlines and pilots, but closing the gap in the shortage must happen simultaneously in order for it to succeed.
     

    Stay tuned to WINGSPAN for even more developments in the pilot shortage and the changes that we are helping to leverage together.

    4 MIN.

    PILOT SHORTAGE: THE FUTURE OF REGIONAL AVIATION

    PILOT SHORTAGE: THE FUTURE OF REGIONAL AVIATION
    WINGSPAN - Pilot Shortage: The Future of Regional Aviation

    One of the biggest game changers recently in the regional aviation space is the introduction of the impressive CRJ550 aircraft. Since launching just a few years ago, it’s raised the bar in terms of comfort, space, and amenities for regional travel. But with the pilot shortage keeping many of these aircraft grounded, what’s next for the future of regional aviation?

    The demand to get aircraft off the ground and in the air is ever-present. However, the obstacle of the pilot shortage continues to stand in the way. As MHIRJ remains united with industry partners in lobbying for change, we attended the Regional Airline Association meeting in Washington, D.C. While there, we chatted with Rick Leach, President and CEO of GoJet Airlines—a regional carrier for United Airlines. We discussed what’s on the horizon for regional aviation, and what it’s going to take to get there:

     

    Watch the full video


     

    POWERING A PREMIUM EXPERIENCE

    The CRJ550 aircraft is the only aircraft in its class with premium seating in two thirds of its spacious cabins, as well as first-class food and beverages—all of which has been overwhelmingly well received by the traveling public. For a regional product to rival the amenities of mainline aircraft is a big deal for the industry in that it’s helped change people’s perspective and created new appeal.

    “It has amenities for the first-class passenger that are unmatched. It has leg room, and it has the ability to store ample carry-on baggage so people can bring their luggage on, get it there, grab it and go. They're not waiting on the jet bridge. Customers even want to schedule their flights around the 550,” explains Leach.

    POWER IN NUMBERS

    In order to keep these impressive aircraft in flight, it takes banding together with other industry players to keep the momentum of change in the air. “Our voice is much stronger together,” says Leach, when talking about how leaders of regional carriers have been working alongside MHIRJ and other partners. “We have aircraft that are sitting on the ground because we can't staff them since we don't have the capacity or the pilots with the caliber needed to be in those cockpits.”

    However, as much as these pilots are needed, and needed fast, the industry cannot compromise on safety. Pilots still need to undergo rigorous training to ensure safety measures are maintained to the highest degree. What needs to happen from here on is for pilots to aspire to fly with regional airlines as much as their mainline counterparts. The fact that the CRJ500 is one of the highest-rated aircraft in the United fleet does hold weight, “and we're very proud of that for a regional aircraft to have that kind of a recognition,” Leach continues.

    With even more growth on the horizon, they are not only trying to get existing aircraft back in the air. They are preparing to add even more to the fleet. This kind of organic growth presents amazing opportunity for airlines and pilots, but closing the gap in the shortage must happen simultaneously in order for it to succeed.
     

    Stay tuned to WINGSPAN for even more developments in the pilot shortage and the changes that we are helping to leverage together.

    4 MIN.
  • PILOT SHORTAGE: RALLYING THE INDUSTRY

    PILOT SHORTAGE: RALLYING THE INDUSTRY

    WINGSPAN - Pilot Shortage: Rallying the Industry

    While the current pilot shortage is creating a major impact on regional airlines and the communities they serve, it’s also affecting its partners like airports, suppliers, and MROs like MHIRJ. A number of viable solutions have been brought to light, but it’s up to lawmakers and policymakers to put them into play.

    When it comes to lobbying for critical change in the aviation industry, it’s imperative for all players to maintain a united front. We sat down to address the issue with Drew Jacoby Lemos, Vice-President Government Affairs with the Regional Airline Association (RAA), at their recent meeting in Washington, D.C.

    What everyone can agree on is that the pilot shortage needs urgent solutions in order to keep communities connected and businesses thriving. However, change can only happen once lawmakers and policymakers are able to acknowledge the pain and frustration and begin addressing the problem.

    We can't solve it ourselves because so much of what we do depends on a cooperative and collaborative relationship with the FAA,” says Jacoby Lemos.


     

    Watch the full video


     

    NEW TECHNOLOGY IS ON THE HORIZON

    Something else to consider in relation to the pilot shortage is that in order to bring on the next generation of fuel-efficient aircrafts, “We need to have an industry that's robust and vibrant,” he said. These new technologies  will play a critical role in accomplishing climate mitigation efforts, but the industry has to be strong enough to support the new technologies and their manufacturers.

    As the shortage persists, it will take a lot longer to bring them to market, thus highlighting the urgent need for more pilots. Maintaining a united front must continue in order to effectively lobby for rapid and effective changes moving forward.

     

    STRONGER TOGETHER

    The labor shortage needs to remain a top priority at every level. It’s imperative to keep service up and running, to keep communities connected, and to maintain economic stability and quality of life.

    All industry stakeholders and the impacted communities need to get involved in order for our collective voices to be heard. In this spirit, MHIRJ recently joined the Rally For Air Service
    coalition, a group comprised of industry partners, airports, airlines, and concerned citizens uniting for action on the pilot shortage. Find out more at RallyforAirService.org.

     

    5 MIN.

    PILOT SHORTAGE: RALLYING THE INDUSTRY

    PILOT SHORTAGE: RALLYING THE INDUSTRY
    WINGSPAN - Pilot Shortage: Rallying the Industry

    While the current pilot shortage is creating a major impact on regional airlines and the communities they serve, it’s also affecting its partners like airports, suppliers, and MROs like MHIRJ. A number of viable solutions have been brought to light, but it’s up to lawmakers and policymakers to put them into play.

    When it comes to lobbying for critical change in the aviation industry, it’s imperative for all players to maintain a united front. We sat down to address the issue with Drew Jacoby Lemos, Vice-President Government Affairs with the Regional Airline Association (RAA), at their recent meeting in Washington, D.C.

    What everyone can agree on is that the pilot shortage needs urgent solutions in order to keep communities connected and businesses thriving. However, change can only happen once lawmakers and policymakers are able to acknowledge the pain and frustration and begin addressing the problem.

    We can't solve it ourselves because so much of what we do depends on a cooperative and collaborative relationship with the FAA,” says Jacoby Lemos.


     

    Watch the full video


     

    NEW TECHNOLOGY IS ON THE HORIZON

    Something else to consider in relation to the pilot shortage is that in order to bring on the next generation of fuel-efficient aircrafts, “We need to have an industry that's robust and vibrant,” he said. These new technologies  will play a critical role in accomplishing climate mitigation efforts, but the industry has to be strong enough to support the new technologies and their manufacturers.

    As the shortage persists, it will take a lot longer to bring them to market, thus highlighting the urgent need for more pilots. Maintaining a united front must continue in order to effectively lobby for rapid and effective changes moving forward.

     

    STRONGER TOGETHER

    The labor shortage needs to remain a top priority at every level. It’s imperative to keep service up and running, to keep communities connected, and to maintain economic stability and quality of life.

    All industry stakeholders and the impacted communities need to get involved in order for our collective voices to be heard. In this spirit, MHIRJ recently joined the Rally For Air Service
    coalition, a group comprised of industry partners, airports, airlines, and concerned citizens uniting for action on the pilot shortage. Find out more at RallyforAirService.org.

     

    5 MIN.
  • PILOT SHORTAGE: CONSEQUENCES OF INACTION

    PILOT SHORTAGE: CONSEQUENCES OF INACTION

    WINGSPAN - Pilot Shortage: Consequences of Inaction

    From reduced availability to rising fares, the effects of the pilot shortage are projected to remain for some time. For smaller communities, the impact on travel and the economy is being felt on a larger scale than bigger cities. We asked an industry expert for his insights on what he thinks this means for the future of regional aviation and economic stability.

    Without enough pilots, there isn’t enough service. Without enough service, smaller communities become cut off from the larger network. How far will people have to drive to get to a flight? Will businesses rethink where they are located? Will enough pilots be trained before more airports close down? These questions continue to buzz around as the issue persists.

    As part of our efforts to stay united with our industry partners in lobbying for change, MHIRJ attended the Regional Airline Association meeting in Washington, D.C. While there, we had an insightful conversation with industry analyst and data expert, Courtney Miller, about what he sees happening down the line if viable solutions are not put into play in a timely manner.

    According to Miller, “
    Regional aviation is like a beating heart connecting communities.” With this in mind, he stressed the need for regulators to take the issue seriously and to implement changes as fast as possible:

     

    Option A

     


     

    THE ECONOMIC IMPACT
     

    If the imbalance of supply and demand is not remedied with a clear path to enlisting more pilots, “The number of small communities losing service will only rise,” says Miller. “The backbone of America is built on smaller communities. There are a lot of small- to medium-sized communities that generate decent economic impact for their states.” This economic impact is being felt by cargo and freight carriers who are seeing a drop in demand. If not rectified, the impact of this downturn will be felt for years to come.

    By continuing to have these conversations, we can collectively keep a spotlight on the issue and lobby for critical change 
    with our legislators. Explore WINGSPAN for more conversations and valuable insights from our community.

     

    3 MIN.

    PILOT SHORTAGE: CONSEQUENCES OF INACTION

    PILOT SHORTAGE: CONSEQUENCES OF INACTION
    WINGSPAN - Pilot Shortage: Consequences of Inaction

    From reduced availability to rising fares, the effects of the pilot shortage are projected to remain for some time. For smaller communities, the impact on travel and the economy is being felt on a larger scale than bigger cities. We asked an industry expert for his insights on what he thinks this means for the future of regional aviation and economic stability.

    Without enough pilots, there isn’t enough service. Without enough service, smaller communities become cut off from the larger network. How far will people have to drive to get to a flight? Will businesses rethink where they are located? Will enough pilots be trained before more airports close down? These questions continue to buzz around as the issue persists.

    As part of our efforts to stay united with our industry partners in lobbying for change, MHIRJ attended the Regional Airline Association meeting in Washington, D.C. While there, we had an insightful conversation with industry analyst and data expert, Courtney Miller, about what he sees happening down the line if viable solutions are not put into play in a timely manner.

    According to Miller, “
    Regional aviation is like a beating heart connecting communities.” With this in mind, he stressed the need for regulators to take the issue seriously and to implement changes as fast as possible:

     

    Option A

     


     

    THE ECONOMIC IMPACT
     

    If the imbalance of supply and demand is not remedied with a clear path to enlisting more pilots, “The number of small communities losing service will only rise,” says Miller. “The backbone of America is built on smaller communities. There are a lot of small- to medium-sized communities that generate decent economic impact for their states.” This economic impact is being felt by cargo and freight carriers who are seeing a drop in demand. If not rectified, the impact of this downturn will be felt for years to come.

    By continuing to have these conversations, we can collectively keep a spotlight on the issue and lobby for critical change 
    with our legislators. Explore WINGSPAN for more conversations and valuable insights from our community.

     

    3 MIN.
  • PILOT SHORTAGE: KEEPING THE NATION CONNECTED

    PILOT SHORTAGE: KEEPING THE NATION CONNECTED

    Interview with Bryan Bedford

    As the pressing need for pilots continues to climb, the availability of regional flights continues to wane. What can be done to expedite training and close the gap without sacrificing safety?

    There has always been an immense need for regional aviation in the United States. From keeping small communities connected, to the nation’s transportation system, to local travel, the post-pandemic demand remains high. In fact, over 70% of airports rely on regional service alone in order to operate.

    However, the current pilot shortage and other surrounding circumstances continue to take their toll on both flight availability and cost. MHIRJ recently attended the Regional Airline Association meeting in Washington, D.C. where this was one of the most talked-about topics. We had the pleasure of sitting down with Bryan Bedford, CEO and President of Republic Airways, to get his insights on the policy issues currently affecting regional airlines in particular.

    While the pilot shortage actually began some years ago, it’s been further exacerbated by the fact that thousands of more senior aviators retired early, leaving us with a skilled void that needs to be filled, and hundreds of grounded aircraft across the country. Bedford expanded on three key effects:

     

    Watch the full video

     

     

     

     

    When speaking about modern regional aviation, “The days of very robust schedules, lots of convenience, lots of competitive services, and competitive ticket prices—that’s probably not going to be realistic for the next several years,” he explained.


    OPPORTUNITIES FOR THE GOVERNMENT AND THE INDUSTRY TO COLLABORATE
     

    When it comes to training new pilots, what remains paramount is the need for safety and efficiency. However, current policies leave barriers that require new solutions—and it all starts with cost. “We have a challenge right now that it takes so long and it’s so expensive to become a pilot in the United States, so the burden is dissuading young men and women from considering the profession. And it’s creating an absolute iron wall barrier of entry for minority families to have their sons or daughters even dream of a transformational career in aviation. And that’s really unacceptable,” Bedford explained.

    A suggested solution that could help even the playing field is funding for tuition, which currently costs approximately $200,000, and which few families can afford. Conversations need to be had with regulators and legislators on how we can create better, safer training with lower tuition. “We need to have serious thought on how we rethink training, and how we can do it in less time with less cost and we can produce superior, safer, more competent pilots in the process,” he adds.

     

    Watch the full video


     

    REDUCING TIME WITHOUT COMPROMISING SAFETY
     

    Aside from reducing cost, reducing time would also help alleviate the shortage faster. But the caveat with this is the associated risk of reducing safety. Would accelerating training in fact compromise safety? Not necessarily. Since the 1,500-hour rule became effective at the end of 2013, Bedford noticed significant increases in failure rates, with the reason being that they simply needed better training, curriculum, and structure. “We think there’s a better way to train pilots with more hands-on commercial training, as opposed to what the marketplace is offering today.”

    This is where the conversations with the FAA come into play. Improvements in education and funding will make way for an easier path to a career as a pilot, and in turn reduce disruption in regional aviation.

    7 MIN.

    PILOT SHORTAGE: KEEPING THE NATION CONNECTED

    PILOT SHORTAGE: KEEPING THE NATION CONNECTED
    Interview with Bryan Bedford

    As the pressing need for pilots continues to climb, the availability of regional flights continues to wane. What can be done to expedite training and close the gap without sacrificing safety?

    There has always been an immense need for regional aviation in the United States. From keeping small communities connected, to the nation’s transportation system, to local travel, the post-pandemic demand remains high. In fact, over 70% of airports rely on regional service alone in order to operate.

    However, the current pilot shortage and other surrounding circumstances continue to take their toll on both flight availability and cost. MHIRJ recently attended the Regional Airline Association meeting in Washington, D.C. where this was one of the most talked-about topics. We had the pleasure of sitting down with Bryan Bedford, CEO and President of Republic Airways, to get his insights on the policy issues currently affecting regional airlines in particular.

    While the pilot shortage actually began some years ago, it’s been further exacerbated by the fact that thousands of more senior aviators retired early, leaving us with a skilled void that needs to be filled, and hundreds of grounded aircraft across the country. Bedford expanded on three key effects:

     

    Watch the full video

     

     

     

     

    When speaking about modern regional aviation, “The days of very robust schedules, lots of convenience, lots of competitive services, and competitive ticket prices—that’s probably not going to be realistic for the next several years,” he explained.


    OPPORTUNITIES FOR THE GOVERNMENT AND THE INDUSTRY TO COLLABORATE
     

    When it comes to training new pilots, what remains paramount is the need for safety and efficiency. However, current policies leave barriers that require new solutions—and it all starts with cost. “We have a challenge right now that it takes so long and it’s so expensive to become a pilot in the United States, so the burden is dissuading young men and women from considering the profession. And it’s creating an absolute iron wall barrier of entry for minority families to have their sons or daughters even dream of a transformational career in aviation. And that’s really unacceptable,” Bedford explained.

    A suggested solution that could help even the playing field is funding for tuition, which currently costs approximately $200,000, and which few families can afford. Conversations need to be had with regulators and legislators on how we can create better, safer training with lower tuition. “We need to have serious thought on how we rethink training, and how we can do it in less time with less cost and we can produce superior, safer, more competent pilots in the process,” he adds.

     

    Watch the full video


     

    REDUCING TIME WITHOUT COMPROMISING SAFETY
     

    Aside from reducing cost, reducing time would also help alleviate the shortage faster. But the caveat with this is the associated risk of reducing safety. Would accelerating training in fact compromise safety? Not necessarily. Since the 1,500-hour rule became effective at the end of 2013, Bedford noticed significant increases in failure rates, with the reason being that they simply needed better training, curriculum, and structure. “We think there’s a better way to train pilots with more hands-on commercial training, as opposed to what the marketplace is offering today.”

    This is where the conversations with the FAA come into play. Improvements in education and funding will make way for an easier path to a career as a pilot, and in turn reduce disruption in regional aviation.

    7 MIN.
  • PILOT SHORTAGE: ELEVATING THE TRAINING LANDSCAPE

    PILOT SHORTAGE: ELEVATING THE TRAINING LANDSCAPE

    Interview with Randy Babbitt

    The need for change at every level of the aviation industry remains paramount as we continue to adjust and adapt to the new reality. When it comes to the acute need to train new pilots, time is of the essence. With so much new technology at our disposal, how can we leverage it to our advantage?

    During a time when air travel was thriving, nobody could have predicted the unexpected arrival of the pandemic and the long-lasting impact it would have on the aviation industry. As with any unforeseen event, the only way to get through it is to rally together and pivot as needed. While it brought immense challenges to the table, it also presented the industry with the opportunity to make critical changes, including modifications to the regulations surrounding pilot training.

    While attending the recent Regional Airline Association meeting in Washington, D.C. MHIRJ met with key industry players to have important conversations about current issues like the pilot shortage, and the solutions required to effectively resolve them. When it came down to discussing the need for changes in pilot training, there was no better person to speak to than Randy Babbitt—former commercial airline pilot for 25 years, former President and one of the founding members of the Air Line Pilots Association (ALPA), and former FAA Administrator from 2009–2011.

    From the availability of new technologies to the need for superior safety practices, Babbitt weighed in on what he thinks needs to happen in order to elevate training and cater to today’s reality:

     

    Watch the full video

     

     


    PUTTING TIME ON OUR SIDE

    At the height of the pandemic, airlines had reduced their schedules to 20%, meaning around 80% of pilots weren’t flying at all. At the same time, this had a direct effect on training new pilots. “We've come through a difficult time. The pandemic did not help. You had limitations on people being in proximity. Obviously with masks and so forth, you couldn't even train together because we sit too close together in the airplane,” said Babbitt.

    As a pilot for 25 years himself, and now serving as an advisor to the Regional Airline Association (RAA) on training and safety, Babbitt has experienced the impact first-hand and brings a valuable perspective to the table. Even though the industry has fully resumed training, obstacles remain, like the 1,500-hour flight time requirement for new commercial pilots, in comparison to 750 hours for military pilots. Babbitt explains:

    “They put a requirement that you had to have more flight time. I think one of the areas we could make progress in is recognizing that not all flight hours are created equally. The legislation and aviation rule-making committees have looked at this and have said you're absolutely right. So, we should be able to substitute quality training for a block of flight hours.”

    SAFETY FIRST

    When it comes to hours, what matters is the quality of the hours and the exposure to real-life scenarios. Pilots need to know how to work in a multi-crew environment and how to react accordingly to a variety of challenging situations. From engine failure to hazardous wind shear, experience is everything when it comes to safety training. And that’s where technology comes in.

    “Today’s modern six-axis level D simulator is precisely like flying the airplane. Technology has made huge advances in training and allowing us to better train pilots to the situations they’re going to operate in,” he said.

    Since data supports the fact that new technologies in flight simulation do support better safety training, Babbitt hopes that regulators will acknowledge the value in augmented and virtual reality when it comes to required training hours. Modernizing training requirements can help get pilots accredited and in the air faster, helping to close the pilot shortage gap.

     

     

     

     

    6 MIN.

    PILOT SHORTAGE: ELEVATING THE TRAINING LANDSCAPE

    PILOT SHORTAGE: ELEVATING THE TRAINING LANDSCAPE
    Interview with Randy Babbitt

    The need for change at every level of the aviation industry remains paramount as we continue to adjust and adapt to the new reality. When it comes to the acute need to train new pilots, time is of the essence. With so much new technology at our disposal, how can we leverage it to our advantage?

    During a time when air travel was thriving, nobody could have predicted the unexpected arrival of the pandemic and the long-lasting impact it would have on the aviation industry. As with any unforeseen event, the only way to get through it is to rally together and pivot as needed. While it brought immense challenges to the table, it also presented the industry with the opportunity to make critical changes, including modifications to the regulations surrounding pilot training.

    While attending the recent Regional Airline Association meeting in Washington, D.C. MHIRJ met with key industry players to have important conversations about current issues like the pilot shortage, and the solutions required to effectively resolve them. When it came down to discussing the need for changes in pilot training, there was no better person to speak to than Randy Babbitt—former commercial airline pilot for 25 years, former President and one of the founding members of the Air Line Pilots Association (ALPA), and former FAA Administrator from 2009–2011.

    From the availability of new technologies to the need for superior safety practices, Babbitt weighed in on what he thinks needs to happen in order to elevate training and cater to today’s reality:

     

    Watch the full video

     

     


    PUTTING TIME ON OUR SIDE

    At the height of the pandemic, airlines had reduced their schedules to 20%, meaning around 80% of pilots weren’t flying at all. At the same time, this had a direct effect on training new pilots. “We've come through a difficult time. The pandemic did not help. You had limitations on people being in proximity. Obviously with masks and so forth, you couldn't even train together because we sit too close together in the airplane,” said Babbitt.

    As a pilot for 25 years himself, and now serving as an advisor to the Regional Airline Association (RAA) on training and safety, Babbitt has experienced the impact first-hand and brings a valuable perspective to the table. Even though the industry has fully resumed training, obstacles remain, like the 1,500-hour flight time requirement for new commercial pilots, in comparison to 750 hours for military pilots. Babbitt explains:

    “They put a requirement that you had to have more flight time. I think one of the areas we could make progress in is recognizing that not all flight hours are created equally. The legislation and aviation rule-making committees have looked at this and have said you're absolutely right. So, we should be able to substitute quality training for a block of flight hours.”

    SAFETY FIRST

    When it comes to hours, what matters is the quality of the hours and the exposure to real-life scenarios. Pilots need to know how to work in a multi-crew environment and how to react accordingly to a variety of challenging situations. From engine failure to hazardous wind shear, experience is everything when it comes to safety training. And that’s where technology comes in.

    “Today’s modern six-axis level D simulator is precisely like flying the airplane. Technology has made huge advances in training and allowing us to better train pilots to the situations they’re going to operate in,” he said.

    Since data supports the fact that new technologies in flight simulation do support better safety training, Babbitt hopes that regulators will acknowledge the value in augmented and virtual reality when it comes to required training hours. Modernizing training requirements can help get pilots accredited and in the air faster, helping to close the pilot shortage gap.

     

     

     

     

    6 MIN.
  • PILOT SHORTAGE: UNITED FRONT

    PILOT SHORTAGE: UNITED FRONT

    Interview with Ross Mitchell on Pilot Shortage

    As the pilot shortage continues, members of the aviation industry are rallying together to push for resolution. As the largest regional MRO, MHIRJ is working in solidarity with our industry partners to lobby for change, so we joined them at the recent Regional Airline Association meeting in Washington, D.C. While there, we sat down with Ross Mitchell, Vice-President, Strategy and Business Development at MHIRJ, to talk about the impact it’s having on a community level, and the solutions being implemented on a national level.

    While issues related to the pilot shortage cannot possibly be remedied overnight, the urgency of the situation remains very real. From customers to Congress, everyone is talking about the challenges the regional aviation industry is facing in the U.S., and the short- and long-term solutions that need to be brought to the table.

    By connecting with other members of the industry, we can all better understand these solutions, along with what needs to be done to make them happen. Together, we can strive to return to fully functional service without a labour shortage. Mitchell explains:

     

     

    Watch the full video

     

     

    STRONGER TOGETHER

    The key takeaway is that finding solutions to relieve the labour shortage needs to remain a top priority at every level. It’s imperative to keep service up and running, to keep communities connected, and to maintain economic stability and quality of life.

    All industry stakeholders and the impacted communities need to be involved in order for our collective voices to be heard. In this spirit, MHIRJ recently joined The Rally For Air Service coalition, a group comprised of industry partners, airports, airlines, and concerned citizens uniting for action on the pilot shortage. Find out more at RallyforAirService.com.

     

    Let’s continue the conversation, keep pushing for change, and keep our sights set on a better future in aviation.

    3 MIN.

    PILOT SHORTAGE: UNITED FRONT

    PILOT SHORTAGE: UNITED FRONT
    Interview with Ross Mitchell on Pilot Shortage

    As the pilot shortage continues, members of the aviation industry are rallying together to push for resolution. As the largest regional MRO, MHIRJ is working in solidarity with our industry partners to lobby for change, so we joined them at the recent Regional Airline Association meeting in Washington, D.C. While there, we sat down with Ross Mitchell, Vice-President, Strategy and Business Development at MHIRJ, to talk about the impact it’s having on a community level, and the solutions being implemented on a national level.

    While issues related to the pilot shortage cannot possibly be remedied overnight, the urgency of the situation remains very real. From customers to Congress, everyone is talking about the challenges the regional aviation industry is facing in the U.S., and the short- and long-term solutions that need to be brought to the table.

    By connecting with other members of the industry, we can all better understand these solutions, along with what needs to be done to make them happen. Together, we can strive to return to fully functional service without a labour shortage. Mitchell explains:

     

     

    Watch the full video

     

     

    STRONGER TOGETHER

    The key takeaway is that finding solutions to relieve the labour shortage needs to remain a top priority at every level. It’s imperative to keep service up and running, to keep communities connected, and to maintain economic stability and quality of life.

    All industry stakeholders and the impacted communities need to be involved in order for our collective voices to be heard. In this spirit, MHIRJ recently joined The Rally For Air Service coalition, a group comprised of industry partners, airports, airlines, and concerned citizens uniting for action on the pilot shortage. Find out more at RallyforAirService.com.

     

    Let’s continue the conversation, keep pushing for change, and keep our sights set on a better future in aviation.

    3 MIN.